Offline, Online…

Gremlins attacked the server this week and I’ve been unable to log on until today: my usual tactic with computers of ignoring the problem until it went away worked out in the end. This is fortunate as I didn’t have a plan ‘B’.

My inability to understand/repair/operate computers is one reason I tell stories live rather then with videos.

‘Steam and Pirates’, the industrial revolution evening, is taking shape, and because I don’t have enough ideas at the moment, I’m developing the next project: “Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’ in 45 minutes”. Some German schools have a play by Shakespeare in their English courses, which is remarkable as British school students find it hard enough and it is (almost) our first language.

Several local people were kind enough to say they would talk to their teachers about inviting me if I prepared a workshop so I’ve been doing background research this week.

Amongst other things, I’ve found that in Shakespeare’s time Propaganda was as common as it is now, the play as we know it is missing several pages, and as usual, the true stories from the time of the play are almost as incredible as the play itself.

More details to follow, and possibly pictures…

Video: Janko’s Dog

The second video from ‘A Great British Evening’: the story of Janko’s dog. This is a story about the Roma people in the UK. I really wanted to include a story about the Roma because their culture tends to be ignored, and is almost invisible in a lot of places, and they still face a great deal of prejudice today, even though they are in theory protected by the law now.

The story is made up of themes from several original Roma stories. At fifteen minutes I thought it may be a bit long, but the action comes pretty quickly and audiences seem to like it.

Any thoughts welcome. Having watched both videos several times while I edited and posted them, I’ve decided I really need to leave the waistcoat open in future.

 

Voting results…

So, the results of the vote are in: thanks thanks to those who voted for taking the time to let me know what you think.

The vote came in as 70% for the Industrial Revolution stories, and 30% for more Folktales, so I know what I’ll be talking about next time. I will come back to Folktales later in the year…

Now the fun part starts: finding stories and knocking them into shape for an evening together. There will be new pictures too, and you’ll see them here first…

 

Monsters or Steam engines?

As I said last week, this is where I start asking for your opinion. I’ve started work on the next storytelling evening*, and I am wondering if I should make it like last time, a mix of stories and a bit of history, or maybe carry on where “A Great British Evening” finished, and tell stories from the industrial revolution in Britain. Those are mostly true stories, although you may find the folktales more believable.

I finally won the battle with the website and you can now simply click to vote for your preferred theme:

You don’t have to log in or anything, just click one of the points and press the big yellow ‘vote’ button. If you don’t mind either way, or you have another idea, let me know in the comments.

 I’ll publish the results next week along with a video, as long as the computer isn’t sulking…

*If you haven’t been taking notes it is in Pfarrtrasse 4, Ostfildern Kemnat, again, on Saturday the 4th & 11th of July, bring a friend…

Here we go again…

2015-04-19_027So a ‘Great British Evening’ went really well. Many thanks again to those who came, gave feedback, and and joined the email list. It is really encouraging to have you aboard.

Now I’m working on the next step: another two evenings in the same place -the Evangelische Jugendhaus in Pfarrtrasse 4, Ostfildern Kemnat. on Saturday the 4th and Saturday the 11th of July. Please book one of the dates, and for those who came before, please bring a(nother) friend this time.

I’ll start planning the evening in a week or so, and I’ll be asking for opinions about the content: there may be voting. so please come over then, and let me know what you think.